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NRC Projects Sea-Level Rise for California, Oregon, and Washington

Sea-level rise poses enormous risks to the valuable infrastructure, development, and wetlands that line much of the 1,600 mile shoreline of California, Oregon, and Washington.  As those states seek to incorporate projections of sea-level rise into coastal planning, they asked the National Research Council to make independent projections of sea-level rise along their coasts for the years 2030, 2050, and 2100, taking into account regional factors that affect sea level.

Sea level along the U.S. west coast is affected by a number of factors, including climate patterns such as the El Niño, effects from the melting of modern and ancient ice sheets, and geologic processes, such as plate tectonics.  The analysis by the authoring committee of this report show a sharp distinction at Cape Mendocino in northern California. South of that point, sea-level rise is expected to be very close to global projections.  However, north of Cape Mendocino, sea-level rise is projected to be lower because the land is being pushed upward as the ocean plate moves under the continental plate along the Cascadia Subduction Zone.  However, an earthquake magnitude 8 or larger, which occurs in the region every few hundred to 1,000 years, would cause the land to drop and sea level to suddenly rise.

Watch this video to learn about the main findings of the report. A brief summary and key findings are also available.

Permanent link to this article: http://nas-sites.org/americasclimatechoices/sea-level-rise/

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