Images

These images, featured in the report Earth Observations from Space: The First 50 Years of Scientific Achievements, illustrate the many scientific advancements enabled by satellite observations.

Click on any image to see it full size.

Blue marble

FIGURE S.1: The blue marble as seen by the crew of Apollo 17. Image (AS17-148-22727) courtesy of the Image Science & Analysis Laboratory, NASA Johnson Space Center.

Sea Ice off Greenland

FIGURE 2.10: Detail of sea ice off the west coast of Greenland from ERS 1. SOURCE: ERS-1 User Handbook, SP-1148, European Space Agency, Paris

Larsen Ice Shelf collapse

FIGURE S.2: Collapse of the Larsen Ice Shelf in Western Antarctica, January-March 2002. Two thousand square kilometers of the ice shelf disintegrated in just 2 days. SOURCE: National Snow and Ice Data Center, University of Colorado.

Explorer 1

FIGURE 2.3: Explorer 1 with architects (left to right) William H. Pickering, director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory; James A. Van Allen, chief scientist; and Wernher von Braun, leader of the Army's Redstone Arsenal team. SOURCE: Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

TIROS 1 and technician

FIGURE 2.4: TIROS 1 and technician. SOURCE: National Archives Photo 370-MSP-4-147.

First image of weather from space

FIGURE 2.5: TIROS 1: first TV picture of weather from space, April 1, 1960. SOURCE: NASA

Geostationary satellites

FIGURE 2.7: During the Global Weather Experiment, five international geostationary satellites supported global observations of cloud-tracked winds. SOURCE: NOAA (1984).

Artist's drawing of the Nimbus

FIGURE 2.9: Artist's drawing of the general design of the Nimbus series of satellites. SOURCE: C. R. Madrid, ed. (1978), The Nimbus 7 Users' Guide, Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA.

First complete view of the world's weather

FIGURE 3.3: First complete view of the world's weather, photographed by TIROS 9, February 13, 1965. Image assembled from 450 individual photographs. SOURCE: Publication of NOAA (NOAA Central Library).

Hemispheric coverage of a geostationary satellite

FIGURE 3.4: Example of the hemispheric coverage of a geostationary satellite. Taken by NASA's Applications Technology Satellite 3 (ATS 3) at 1402 UTC on July 21, 1970. Note that Tropical Storm Becky can be seen in the Gulf of Mexico near Florida. SOURCE: NOAA Photo Library.

Hurricane Katrina

FIGURE 3.5: At 1745 UTC on August 28, 2005, Hurricane Katrina was observed by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES 12) near the time of its maximum wind speed, 150 knots (173 miles per hour). SOURCE: National Hurricane Center.

Vertically integrated water content of the atmosphere

FIGURE 3.6: Vertically integrated water content of the atmosphere (in kilograms per square meter) derived from microwave measurements on six sun-synchronous satellites, three NOAA satellites, and three Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites. SOURCE: Data from NOAA; drawing by S. Kidder, Colorado State University

Wind

FIGURE 3.7: Winds obtained by tracking clouds in successive infrared images. The height of the cloud is determined by the cloud's temperature. Note that where there are no trackable clouds, no winds can be retrieved. SOURCE: NOAA.

African dust storm

FIGURE 4.10: An intense African dust storm sent a massive dust plume northwestward over the Atlantic Ocean on March 2, 2003. In this true-color scene, acquired by MODIS aboard NASA's Terra satellite, the thick dust plume (light brown) can be seen blowing westward and then routed northward by strong southerly winds. The plume extends more than 1,000 miles (1,600 km), covering a vast swath of ocean extending from the Cape Verde Islands (lower left), off the coast of Senegal, to the Canary Islands (top center), off the coast of Morocco. SOURCE: Image courtesy of Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Rapid Response team, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center; http://visibleearth.nasa.gov/view_rec.php?id=5619.

Average distribution of atmospheric aerosol amounts

Images, Page 2

These images, featured in the report Earth Observations from Space: The First 50 Years of Scientific Achievements, illustrate the many scientific advancements enabled by satellite observations. Click on any image to see it full size.

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Tracking pollution

Images, Page 3

These images, featured in the report Earth Observations from Space: The First 50 Years of Scientific Achievements, illustrate the many scientific advancements enabled by satellite observations. Click on any image to see it full size.

View page »

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