Metabolomics as a Tool for Characterizing the Exposome: Presentations

Posted on

On May 28-29, 2015 The Standing Committee on Use of Emerging Science for Environmental Health Decisions convened a 2-day workshop, Metabolomics as a Tool for Characterizing the Exposome.

Each title links to a PDF of the workshop presentation, unless otherwise noted.

Workshop Video Playlist (YouTube)

 

Day 1: May 28, 2015

Session 1 Use of Metabolomics to Characterize Human Exposures to Environmental Stressors — A Vision

Session Moderator: Chirag Patel, Harvard University

Welcome and Opening Comments — Chirag Patel†, Harvard University

NIEHS Perspective — David Balshaw, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

What Is the Exposome? — Stephen Rappaport, University of California, Berkeley

Use of Metabolomics to Characterize Exposure — David Wishart, University of Alberta

Addressing the Analytical Challenges Presented by the Human Exposome: What Are We Measuring, How, and Why? — Toby Athersuch, Imperial College London

Q&A Session (video only)

 

Session 2 Collecting Metabolomics Data: Technical Challenges and Opportunities

Session Moderator: Ana Navas-Acien, Johns Hopkins University–Bloomberg School of Public Health

Challenges in Separation Technologies — Erin Baker, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Detection Challenges — Anthony Macherone, Agilent Technologies and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Panel Discussion — Collecting Metabolomics Data: Technical Challenges and Opportunities (video only)

Panel Moderator: Dean Jones, Emory University

−−Susan Sumner, RTI International

−−Andrew Patterson, Penn State University

−−Anthony Macherone, Agilent Technologies and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

−−Erin Baker, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

−−Stephen Rappaport, University of California, Berkeley

 

Session 3 Turning Data into Information

Session Moderator: David Balshaw, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Challenges in Data Processing and Compound Identification — Oliver Fiehn, University of California, Davis

Tools for Community Annotation of Metabolomics Information — Pieter Dorrestein, University of California, San Diego

Panel Discussion — Turning Data into Information (video only)

Panel Moderator: David Balshaw, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

−−David Wishart, University of Alberta

−−Chirag Patel†, Harvard University

−−Pieter Dorrestein, University of California, San Diego

−−Oliver Fiehn, University of California, Davis

 

Session 4 Metabolomics Case Study

Session Moderator: William Farland, Colorado State University

Understanding Exposure and Disease Etiology  — David Wishart, University of Alberta (video only, presentation file expected to be available at a later date)

Q&A Session (video only)

Day 2: May 29, 2015

Welcome and Recap of Day 1 — Chirag Patel†, Harvard University

 

Session 5 Exposome, Metabolome, and Implications for Decision Making

Session Moderator: Ivan Rusyn, Texas A&M University

Use of Metabolomics to Understand Human Disease; Practical Examples and Challenges  — Roel Vermeulen, Utrecht University (by phone)

Moving Beyond Traditional Measurement: Predicting to Inform Decision Making — Elaine Cohen Hubal, US Environmental Protection Agency

Panel Discussion — Use of Metabolomics to Understand Background Exposures: Research and Policy Implications (video only)

Panel Moderator: Ivan Rusyn†, Texas A&M University

−−George Daston†, Procter & Gamble Company

−−Stephen Rappaport, University of California, Berkeley

−−Elaine Cohen Hubal, US Environmental Protection Agency

−−William Farland†, Colorado State University

−−Benjamin Blount, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (by phone)

  1. Can the metabolome help us to understand adverse outcome pathways based on changes to the metabolome associated with chronic low-level exposures…biomarkers of response?
  2. Can the metabolome help us identify susceptible individuals or populations by flagging pre-existing disease or concurrent exposures which impact response to an exogenous exposure?
  3. Will the metabolome be helpful in quantifying endogenous chemicals that also have exogenous exposures so we understand relative “back­grounds” from physiology versus nutritional or other environmental sources?
  4. How can metabolomics data be incorporated into epidemiological studies?
  5. How will the answers to these questions help us to bring the exposome concept into the risk assessment process?
  6. What are the implications of metabolomics infor­mation for the public understanding of their risk?

Closing Comments — William Farland†, Colorado State University (video only)

 

† indicates a member of the Standing Committee on Use of Emerging Science for Environmental Health Decisions.