U.S. stores of unconventional hydrocarbon resources such as shale oil and natural gas have been developed rapidly in the past decade.  As development has expanded, so has the discussion over the potential advantages and disadvantages of using these resources.

This roundtable, launched in late 2015, provides a neutral forum where representatives from government, industry, academia, and non-governmental and international organizations can meet on an ongoing basis to:

  • gather, critically examine, and communicate facts and data regarding the scientific, engineering, human and environmental health and safety, regulatory, economic, and societal aspects of unconventional hydrocarbon development;
  • identify and help to advance activities that would be of broad value to key stakeholders;
  • assist in informing decision making about development of these resources.

Media from the Roundtable

Reports from the Roundtable

Onshore Unconventional Hydrocarbon Development
Legacy Issues and Innovations in Managing Risk–Day 1: Proceedings of a Workshop

Oil and gas well completion and stimulation technologies to develop unconventional hydrocarbon resources in the United States have evolved over the past several decades, particularly in relation to the development of shale oil and shale gas. Shale oil and shale gas resources and the technology associated with their production are often termed “unconventional” because the oil and gas trapped inside the shale or other low-permeability rock formation cannot be extracted using conventional technologies.

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Onshore Unconventional Hydrocarbon Development
Induced Seismicity and Innovations in Managing Risk–Day 2: Proceedings of a Workshop

Oil and gas well completion and stimulation technologies to develop unconventional hydrocarbon resources in the United States have evolved over the past several decades, particularly in relation to the development of shale oil and shale gas. Shale oil and shale gas resources and the technology associated with their production are often termed “unconventional” because the oil and gas trapped inside the shale or other low-permeability rock formation cannot be extracted using conventional technologies.

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Flowback and Produced Waters
Opportunities and Challenges for Innovation: Proceedings of a Workshop

Produced water—water from underground formations that is brought to the surface during oil and gas production—is the greatest volume byproduct associated with oil and gas production. It is managed by some combination of underground injection, treatment and subsequent use, treatment and discharge, or evaporation, subject to compliance with state and federal regulations.

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Other Academies Reports at a Glance

These reports and many others are available for FREE DOWNLOAD via PDF format on the
National Academy Press website.