PROJECT SUMMARY |||||| TOPICS |||||| REGIONAL EVENTS |||||| MEMBERSHIP |||||| SPONSORS

ABOUT THE ROUNDTABLE

U.S. stores of unconventional hydrocarbon resources such as shale oil and natural gas have been developed rapidly in the past decade.  As development has expanded, so has the discussion over the potential advantages and disadvantages of using these resources.

This roundtable, launched in late 2015 and concluded 2019, provided a neutral forum where representatives from government, industry, academia, and non-governmental and international organizations can meet on an ongoing basis to:

  • gather, critically examine, and communicate facts and data regarding the scientific, engineering, human and environmental health and safety, regulatory, economic, and societal aspects of unconventional hydrocarbon development;
  • identify and help to advance activities that would be of broad value to key stakeholders;
  • assist in informing decision making about development of these resources.
PROJECT SUMMARY
Coming Soon!
TOPICS OF THE ROUNDTABLE


Produced Water


Workshop Proceedings | 4-Page Brief | Watch Topic Video | Watch Workshop Recording

Produced water—water from underground formations that is brought to the surface during oil and gas production—is the greatest volume byproduct associated with oil and gas production. It is managed by some combination of underground injection, treatment and subsequent use, treatment and discharge, or evaporation, subject to compliance with state and federal regulations. Management of these waters is challenging not only for industry and regulators, but also for landowners and the public because of differences in the quality and quantity of produced water, varying infrastructure needs, costs, and environmental considerations associated with produced water disposal, storage, and transport.


Environmental Legacy Issues


Workshop Proceedings | 4-Page Brief | Watch Topic Video | Watch Workshop Recording

Oil and gas well completion and stimulation technologies to develop unconventional hydrocarbon resources in the United States have evolved over the past several decades, particularly in relation to the development of shale oil and shale gas. Shale oil and shale gas resources and the technology associated with their production are often termed “unconventional” because the oil and gas trapped inside the shale or other low-permeability rock formation cannot be extracted using conventional technologies. Since about 2005, the application of these technologies to fields in the U.S. have helped produce natural gas and oil in volumes that allowed the country to reduce its crude oil imports by more than 50% and to become a net natural gas exporter. The regional and national economic and energy advances gained through production and use of these resources have been accompanied, however, by rapid expansion of the infrastructure associated with the development of these fields and public concern over the impacts to surface- and groundwater, air, land, and communities where the resources are extracted.


Induced Seismicity


Workshop Proceedings | 4-Page Brief | Watch Topic Video | Watch Workshop Recording

Oil and gas well completion and stimulation technologies to develop unconventional hydrocarbon resources in the United States have evolved over the past several decades, particularly in relation to the development of shale oil and shale gas. Shale oil and shale gas resources and the technology associated with their production are often termed “unconventional” because the oil and gas trapped inside the shale or other low-permeability rock formation cannot be extracted using conventional technologies. Since about 2005, the application of these technologies to fields in the U.S. have helped produce natural gas and oil in volumes that allowed the country to reduce its crude oil imports by more than 50% and to become a net natural gas exporter. The regional and national economic and energy advances gained through production and use of these resources have been accompanied, however, by rapid expansion of the infrastructure associated with the development of these fields and public concern over the impacts to surface- and groundwater, air, land, and communities where the resources are extracted.


Offshore Well Completion


Workshop Proceedings | Watch Workshop Recording

While the public is generally aware of the use of hydraulic fracturing for unconventional resource development onshore, it is less familiar with the well completion and stimulation technologies used in offshore operations, including hydraulic fracturing, gravel packs, “fracpacks,” and acid stimulation. Just as onshore technologies have improved, these well completion and stimulation technologies for offshore hydrocarbon resource development have progressed over many decades.

REGIONAL EVENTS

Technological advances have expanded the footprint of U.S. oil and gas resource development, both in rural areas and near urban centers. The ability to minimize environmental impacts and manage produced water depends on solid scientific and technical information—much of it regionally specific. Presentations were drawn from peer-reviewed work on environmental legacy and produced water themes from the National Academies’ Roundtable on Unconventional Hydrocarbon Development. Participants were encouraged to share their collective regional wisdom with the Roundtable members.

Denver, CO

Available Media

Pittsburgh, PA

Available Media
Participant Packet

Videos

Produced Water

Keynote: Susan Brantley, Pennsylvania State University

Panel Discussion

  • Susan Brantley, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Scott Perry, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection
  • Jennifer Baka, The Pennsylvania State University
  • David Kinney, Trout Unlimited
  • Dale Arnold, Ohio Farm Bureau Federation

Environmental Legacy Issues

Keynote: Radisav Vidic, University of Pittsburgh

Panel Discussion

  • Radisav Vidic, University of Pittsburgh
  • Denise Akob, U.S. Geological Survey
  • Dave Spigelmyer, Marcellus Shale Coalition
  • Gautam Phanse, Chevron Technology Ventures
  • Angie Rosser, West Virginia Rivers Coalition

Midland, TX

Available Media
Participant Packet

Videos

Environmental Legacy Issues

Keynote: Danny Reible, Texas Tech University

Panel Discussion

  • Danny Reible, Texas Tech University
  • Melinda Taylor, University of Texas
  • Bo Vizcaino, Texas Railroad Commission

Water Sourcing and Produced Water Management

Keynote: Bridget Scanlon, Bureau of Economic Geology

Panel Discussion

  • Bridget Scanlon, Bureau of Economic Geology
  • Nichole Saunders, Environmental Defense Fund
  • Rick McCurdy, Chesapeake Energy Corporation
  • Robert Bruant, B3
  • Aaron Velasco, University of Texas El Paso, Texas Railroad Commission

ROUNDTABLE MEMBERSHIP
Co-Chairs


David Dzombak
Carnegie Mellon University


Wendy Harrison
Colorado School of Mines

Members


Melissa Batum
Senior Program Analyst
Bureau of Ocean Energy Management
U.S. Department of the Interior
Division of Environmental Assessment


Susan L. Brantley (NAS)
Distinguished Professor and Director
Earth and Environmental Systems Institute
The Pennsylvania State University


David Cole
Professor
The Ohio State University


David Curtiss
Executive Director
American Association of Petroleum Geologists


L. David Glatt
Section Chief, Environmental Health
North Dakota Department of Health and
Co-Chair, Environmental Council of the States’ Shale Gas Caucus


Julia Hobson Haggerty
Assistant Professor
Department of Earth Sciences
Montana State University


Steven P. Hamburg
Chief Scientist
Environmental Defense Fund


Marilu Hastings
Vice President, Sustainability Program
The Cynthia and George Mitchell Foundation


Joe Lima
Director, Environmental Sustainability
Schlumberger Services, Inc.


Elena S. Melchert
Director
Office of Fossil Energy
Department of Energy


Jan Mares
Senior Policy Advisor
Resources for the Future

Evan S. Michelson
Program Officer
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation


C. Michael Ming
General Manager
GE Global Research Oil & Gas Technology Center


Kris J. Nygaard
Senior Stimulation Consultant
ExxonMobil Upstream Research Co.


Amy Pickle
Director, State Policy Program
Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions
Duke University


Geoffrey Plumlee
Associate Director
U.S. Geological Survey


Craig Simmons
Distinguished Professor and Chair
Flinders University


Timothy R. Spisak
Senior Advisor
Bureau of Land Management
Department of the Interior


Berry H. (Nick) Tew, Jr.
Alabama State Geologist and Oil and Gas Supervisor
Geological Survey of Alabama/State Oil and Gas Board and
Official Representative, Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission and Groundwater Protection Council


Scott W. Tinker
Director and State Geologist
Bureau of Economic Geology
Professor and Allday endowed Chair
‎Jackson School of Geosciences, UT Austin
Association of American State Geologists, official representative and past-president
American Association of Petroleum Geologists, past president
American Geosciences Institute, president


Sandra Wiegand
Petroleum Engineer
Department of the Interior
Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement

SPONSORS

Alfred P. Sloan Foundation

American Association of Petroleum Geologists Foundation

Colorado School of Mines

Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy

Department of the Interior

  • Bureau on Safety and Environmental Enforcement
  • Bureau of Ocean Energy Management
  • Bureau of Land Management
  • U.S. Geological Survey

Environmental Defense Fund

ExxonMobil

Flinders University

Baker Hughes, a GE Company

Schlumberger

Texas A&M Engineering

The Cynthia and George Mitchell Foundation

The Ohio State University

West Virginia University